Just Love the C&A Foundation!

http://www.candafoundation.org/impact/news/new-circular-fibres-initiative-brings-industry-tog/

by Circular Fibres on May 11, 2017

The Ellen MacArthur Foundation launches today a new initiative that brings together key industry stakeholders to build a circular economy for textiles, starting with clothing. The initiative is supported by a core philanthropic funder, C&A Foundation, core corporate partners H&M and NIKE, and a consortium of organisations including the Danish Fashion Institute, Fashion for Good, Cradle to Cradle and MISTRA Future Fashion. The announcement was made by Dame Ellen MacArthur at the Copenhagen Fashion Summit.

Participants in the Circular Fibres Initiative will work together to define a vision for a new global fibres system, which will address the significant drawbacks of the ‘take-make-dispose’ model currently dominating the industry. The new system for textiles will be based on the principles of a circular economy, generating growth that benefits citizens and businesses, while phasing out negative impacts such as waste and pollution – an economy fit for the 21st Century.

Textiles is the second global materials flow that the Ellen MacArthur Foundation has focussed on. In 2016, the Foundation launched the New Plastics Economy initiative, bringing together key stakeholders including leading businesses across the value chain, city authorities, intergovernmental organisations, scientists, designers and other innovators, to build a plastics system that works. The success of this first initiative, which includes two major reports presented at the Word Economic Forum in Davos, stakeholder workshops and significant media attention, has highlighted the importance of a pre-competitive, collaborative mindset amongst participants.

“At c, we support the production, uptake, and reuse of sustainable fibres. The Circular Fibres Initiative is important because it will establish the shared agenda and deep collaboration needed to shift the apparel industry to regenerative and sustaining business models.”

Executive Director, C&A Foundation Leslie Johnston

Fibres are an important part of today’s global economy: clothing production has doubled in the last 15 years, with sales of footwear and apparel reaching $1.67 trillion in 2016[1]. Meanwhile consumers keep their clothing for half the time that they did 15 years ago[2]. After use, only around 15% of apparel waste is collected in the US, while the remaining 85% ends up in landfill[3]. This characteristically linear economy, based on extractive and consumptive patterns, puts high demand on land, energy and other resources. The production and use of clothing accounts for around 3% of global CO2 emissions[4], and cotton production is now responsible for a quarter of worldwide insecticide use[5].

As a first step, the Circular Fibres Initiative will produce, with McKinsey & Co. as Knowledge Partner, an analysis of the textiles industry, mapping how textiles flow around the global economy, and the externalities that arise from the current system. It will explore what a new, circular economy for textiles – one that is restorative and regenerative – could look like, and lay out the steps needed to build it. The Initiative’s first report is due for publication in autumn 2017.

“The way we produce, use, and reprocess clothing today is inherently wasteful, and current rising demand increases the negative impacts. The Circular Fibres Initiative aims to catalyse change across the industry by creating an ambitious, fact-based vision for a new global textiles system, underpinned by circular economy principles, that has economic, environmental, and social benefits, and can operate successfully in the long term.”

– Dame Ellen MacArthur, Founder, Ellen MacArthur Foundation

“At C&A Foundation, we support the production, uptake, and reuse of sustainable fibres. The Circular Fibres Initiative is important because it will establish the shared agenda and deep collaboration needed to shift the apparel industry to regenerative and sustaining business models.”

– Leslie Johnston, Executive Director, C&A Foundation

“Our 100% circular vision and our goal to only use recycled or other sustainably sourced materials by 2030 plays a key role in our sustainability agenda. We are aware that our vision means a big change on how fashion is made and enjoyed today and if we want to take the lead in this challenge, collaboration and accelerating innovation and circular systems together with the industry is crucial. The Circular Fibers Initiative will define a shared vision for a new global textile system and it will be an important foundation for collaboration to accelerate the journey towards a circular textile industry.”

– Anna Gedda, Head of Sustainability, H&M Group

________________________________________

[1] www.qz.com/889672/sportswear-is-carrying-the-globa…

[2] www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/sustainability…

[3] www.weardonaterecycle.org

[4] Energy-related CO2 emissions, The Carbon Trust, International Carbon Flows – Clothing (2011)

[5] Yale Environment 360 (2016)

Notes to Editors

For enquiries please contact: 

Clare Mucklow, [email protected]

About the Ellen MacArthur Foundation

The Ellen MacArthur Foundation was created in 2010 to accelerate the transition to a circular economy. The Foundation works across five areas: insight and analysis, business and government, education and training, systemic initiatives, and communication. With its Knowledge Partners (Arup, IDEO, McKinsey & Co., and SYSTEMIQ), and supported by Core Philanthropic Funder (SUN), the Foundation works to quantify the economic opportunity of a circular model and to develop approaches for capturing its value. The Foundation collaborates with its Global Partners (Danone, Google, H&M, Intesa Sanpaolo, NIKE, Inc., Philips, Renault, Unilever), and its CE100 network (businesses, universities, emerging innovators, governments, cities and affiliate organisations), to build capacity, explore collaboration opportunities and to develop circular business initiatives. By establishing platforms such as the New Plastics Economy initiative, the Foundation works to transform key material flows, applying a global, cross-sectoral, cross value chain approach that aims to effect systems change. Learn more at www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org.

Trends for Tomorrow’s Fashion Industry- Part 3

We are up to trend 3!

Trend 3- Biometrics and Bluetooth.

As our world becomes more populated, our world, too, grows more high-tech. Now is the time for companies to invest in technology and join forces with science to develop products with a technical competitive advantage.

Just as the medical field introduces more self-monitoring services, we need our product managers and designers to
put their focus on more biometric apparel. Garments can and will more-so measure heart rate, pulse, temperature, oxygen and hydration levels and more. Textiles and wearables will have reactive properties that are enabled with flexible fibers that are knitted or woven into the fabric to heat us, cool us, keep us alert, and even give us directions through their GPS and Web-enabled components. When polled last month almost 50% of males stated they would purchase apparel that monitors heart rate and hydration and charges their mobile devices. This is up 25% from the previous year. Therefore, as more customers seek these garments for fitness, work, and leisure,
the companies who enter this market early will have a competitive advantage like no other.

Chart: Thanks to www.lifestylemonitor.cottoninc

Trends for Tomorrow’s Fashion Industry- Part 1

Trends to Succeed in Tomorrow’s Fashion Industry- Part 1

photo-1457972703743-4a6585c42ed8      The fashion industry is ever-changing. Nothing stands still. Not the trends, fabrics, colors, silhouettes, nor styles. Not the technology, production operations, nor our marketing strategies. Everything is changing…. just as our world is changing. All of these changes have great impacts on our businesses. Therefore, we must analyze the direction of our industry and consider our planning, development, sourcing, production, marketing and distribution for the future. With our fingers crossed for no dollars lost we shall march forward hoping we are reacting fast enough, smart enough and just the perfect distance ahead of the trends with each delivery.
So where will our ever-changing fashion industry lead us next?

There are seven directional shifts in which our world, consumers, technology, and the fashion industry are moving. We must consider each for our own businesses and ready ourselves to consider which trends we should address, embrace, strategize and execute in order to stay relevant, profitable, and successful in tomorrow’s global fashion market.           The seven trends will be posted in 7 posts on the Fashiondex blog.

Here is trend one::

1- Peer Groups and Purchasing.      

Generational marketing will be more important than ever with three key cohort groups.
First, one-quarter of our consumers, the baby boomers, shall prepare to retire, take on a hobby, and vacation more. What they purchase for the last third of their lives will A photo by Foto Sushi. unsplash.com/photos/6anudmpILw4not be on impulse and must be of value. They have money to spend, but do not require more
belongings. They are streamlining what they own and downsizing their homes. We must work hard to capture what they buy.
Second, the next quarter of our consumers, the millennials, are all grown up and will be becoming homeowners, and more set in their ways. We must be innovative to capture their entrepreneurial and technical spirits. As they grow, they will begin to take less risks, and they too will seek value as thephoto-1446421053596-b6801571b8bcy realize it is time to start saving for their future families. To attract their business, we must offer value plus personalization, and service their entitled images. If we do that, we can keep them as loyal clientele.
Thirdly, and another quarter, is our youth culture who inspires us. Generation Z
(or as demographers refer to them as the i-Gen). Generation Z is entering college and shall continue to Instagram, snapchat, and uber first, while shopping as a pastime last. Tgen-z-girl-2hey are about showing the world where they’re at, not what they have. They’ve seen their millennial siblings in debt, and prefer to keep their dollars close. We must offer them stimulation and value to get them to our channel, and once in- they want something unique that they can showoff in a selfie.
These generational cohorts all will buy, but not much, and to capture their purchases our products must be of value and be customize to them. As manufacturers we must design, develop and manufacture products that have personalization, value and quality built in from conception through every step of the supply chain. We will need to implement lean manufacturing techniques for smaller and higher-quality batches. Our customers will no longer shop for the short-term, they will insist on value and longevity, or they will not purchase.

Next post- is Trend two! Hope you all had a good holiday!

The research for the 7 trends were part of a presentation and assignment for S’s Global Business Management class at LIM College Global Fashion Supply Chain Management MPS program! SO FUN!

All photos from unsplash.com!

 

Learn Along with…. LOGISTICS 101

fullsizerender-50

The question….What is an integrated service provider? How does the concept of an integrated service provider differ from traditional service providers, such as for-hire transportation and warehousing?

An integrated service provider (known in the industry as simply: ISP) is a multi-functional, value-added service which provides- at the minimum- warehousing, distribution, and warehousing services. More often than not, an ISP also performs other essential services, including but not limited to: order processing, receipt of payments, inspection, packing and product delivery.

ISPs are classified in two ways. Either as third-party or fourth-party. Third-party providers are asset-based. They own and operate their own warehouses, truck brigades and equipment. Fourth-party providers are non-asset-based. They specialize in information technology services and provide facilitation between all the functions of the third-party services. Together they provide one valuable supply-chain link that integrates many operations into one service.

No longer do you need to either hire individual transportation and warehousing services or need to invest in your own company trucks or warehouse space, as you did traditionally. In the past, customers had to independently book, oversee and pay for those services separately. That led to lengthy turn-around times and, more importantly, there was no mindset existing of “we are all in this together”. Traditionally the service providers were disjointed, and not interconnected. But this all changed with the deregulation of transportation. It was revolutionary for the industry. Suddenly for-rent warehouses could provide transportation, and for-hire transportation services were providing warehousing…. And they continued to add and add more value-added services, to help the customer and collectively work together to deliver one excellent, timely, and extremely efficient service, now known an as ISP!

 

References: Bowersox, Closs, Cooper, and Bowersox (2013). “Supply Chain Logistics Mgmt-Fourth Edition.”

Learn Along with…. LOGISTICS 101… actually the class is Logistics Managment at LIM College, in their MPS Program, taught by Dr. Ayata!